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Examples

This page provides links to all the examples that appear in the book.  Click a chapter title to view the examples in that chapter.

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Examples By Chapter
'Science' in the Social Sciences
Design Descisions in Research
Social and Behavioral Theories
Administrative Data Systems
Observational Studies
Conversation Analysis
Clinical Trials
Cluster Unit Randomized Trials
Ethical Challenges
Multilevel Modeling
Objective Measurement of Subjective Phenomena
Patient-Reported Outcomes
Heritage J. (1984). Garfinkel and ethnomethodology. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
Schegloff E. A. (1992). Repair after next turn: The last structurally provided defence of intersubjectivity in conversation. American Journal of Sociology 95(5): 1295-1345.
Heritage, John. 2008. Conversation Analysis as Social Theory. In Bryan Turner (Ed), The New Blackwell Companion to Social Theory. Oxford, Blackwell.

Lerner G. (2003). Selecting next speaker: The context sensitive operation of a context-free organization. Language in Society 32: 177-201.
Heritage J. (1998). Oh-prefaced responses to inquiry. Language in society 27(3): 291-334.

Schegloff, E.A. (2006). Interaction: The infrastructure for social institutions, the natural ecological niche for language and the arena in which culture is enacted. In: Enfield N.J., Levinson S.C.,Ed, The Roots of Human Sociality: Culture, Cognition and Interaction. New York: Berg, 70-96.
Heritage, John. 2008. Conversation Analysis as Social Theory. In Bryan Turner (Ed), The New Blackwell Companion to Social Theory. Oxford, Blackwell.

Stivers, T. (2007). Prescribing under pressure: Parent-physician conversations and antibiotics. New York: Oxford University Press.
Heath, C. (1992). The delivery and reception of diagnosis and assessment in the general practice consultation. In: Drew P., Heritage J., Ed, Talk at Work. Cambridge, UK: University Press, 235-267.
Peräkylä A. (1998). Authority and accountability: The delivery of diagnosis in primary health care. Social Psychology Quarterly 61(4): 301-320.

Maynard D. (2003). Bad news, good news: Conversational order in everyday talk and clinical settings. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Maynard D. (1992). On clinicians co-implicating recipients' perspective in the delivery of diagnostic news. In: Drew P., Heritage J., Ed,  Talk at work: Social interaction in institutional settings. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 331-358.
Maynard D. (1996). On 'realization' in everyday life. American Sociological Review 60(1): 109-132.
Maynard D. (2003). Bad news, good news: Conversational order in everyday talk and clinical settings. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Drew P., Heritage J., Eds. (1992). Talk at work: Language use in institutional and work-place settings. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Haakana M. (2001). Laughter as a patient's resource: Dealing with delicate aspects of medical interaction. Text 21(1): 187-219.
Drew P., Heritage J., Eds. (1992). Talk at work: Language use in institutional and work-place settings. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Heritage J., Sefi S. (1992). Dilemmas of advice: Aspects of the delivery and reception of advice in interactions between health visitors and first time mothers. In: Drew P., Heritage J.,Ed,  Talk at work. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 359-4

Boyd E., Heritage J. (2006). Taking the history: Questioning during comprehensive history Taking. In:  Heritage J., Maynard D., Ed,  Communication in Medical Care: Interactions between Primary Care Physicians and Patients. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Unive
Stivers, T. (2007). Prescribing under pressure: Parent-physician conversations and antibiotics. New York: Oxford University Press.

Mishler E. (1984). The discourse of medicine: Dialectics of medical interviews. Norwood NJ: Ablex.

Boyd E., Heritage J. (2006). Taking the history: Questioning during comprehensive history Taking. In:  Heritage J., Maynard D., Ed,  Communication in Medical Care: Interactions between Primary Care Physicians and Patients. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Unive

Drew P. (1997). 'Open' class repair initiators in response to sequential sources of trouble in conversation. Journal of Pragmatics 28: 69-101.
Heritage J. (1998). Oh-prefaced responses to inquiry. Language in society 27(3): 291-334.

Mishler E. (1984). The discourse of medicine: Dialectics of medical interviews. Norwood NJ: Ablex.
Sacks H. (1984). On doing 'Being Ordinary'. In: Atkinson J.M., Heritage J., Ed,  Structures of social action. Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press, 413-429.

Jefferson G. (1985). An exercise in the transcription and analysis of laughter. In: Teun A. Dijk (Ed),  Handbook of discourse analysis Volume 3. New York: Academic Press, 25-34.
Haakana M. (2001). Laughter as a patient's resource: Dealing with delicate aspects of medical interaction. Text 21(1): 187-219.
Jefferson G. (1985). An exercise in the transcription and analysis of laughter. In: Teun A. Dijk (Ed),  Handbook of discourse analysis Volume 3. New York: Academic Press, 25-34.
Jefferson G. (1979). A technique for inviting laughter and its subsequent acceptance/declination. In: Psathas G., Ed,  Everyday language: Studies in ethnomethodology. New York: Irvington Publishers, 79-96.

Subramanian, S. (2004) Multilevel methods, theory and analysis. In: N. Anderson (Ed.). Encyclopedia on Health and Behavior. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. 602-608.
Subramanian, S., Jones, K., et al. (2003) Multilevel methods for public health research. In: I. Kawachi and L. Berkman (Eds.). Neighborhoods and Health. New York: Oxford Press. 65-111.
Diez Roux, A. V. (2002) A glossary for multilevel analysis. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health 56(8): 588-594.

Jones, K., Gould, M. I., et al. (1998) Multiple contexts as cross-classified models: The labor vote in the British general elections of 1992. Geographical Analysis 30: 65-93.
Goldstein, H. (2003) Multilevel statistical models. London: Edward Arnold.
Goldstein, H. (1994) Multilevel cross-classified models. Sociological methods and research 22: 364-375.

Kahneman D., Diener E., Schwarz N. (Eds). (1999). Well-being: The Foundations of Hedonic Psychology. New York : Russell Sage.

Bennett, N. (1976) Teaching styles and pupil progress. London: Open Books.
Aitkin, M., Anderson, D., et al. (1981) Statistical modelling of data on teaching styles (with discussion). Journal of the Royal Statistical Society A 144: 148-161.

WHOQOL Group. (1994). WHOQOL Group, The Development of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument. In: J. Orley and W. Kuyken, (Eds.) Quality of life assessment: International perspectives, Springer,Berlin (1994), pp. 41–57.
Szabo, S. (1996). On behalf of the WHOQOL Group The world health organization quality of life (WHOQOL) assessment instrument. In Spiker, B. Quality of Life and Phramacoeconomics in Clinical Trails. (2Ed.) Philadelphia: Lippincott-Raven Publishers.
Campbell A., Converse S.E., & Rodgers W.L. (1976). The Quality of American Life. New York : Russell Sage.
Campbell A., Converse S.E., & Rodgers W.L. (1976). The Quality of American Life. New York : Russell Sage.
Calman, K.C. (1987). Definitions and dimensions of quality of life. In Aaronson, N.K. & Beckman, J. (Eds.). The Quality of Life of Cancer Patients. Monograph series of the European Organization for Research on the Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Vol 17. New York : Raven.
WHOQOL Group. (1994). WHOQOL Group, The Development of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment Instrument. In: J. Orley and W. Kuyken, (Eds.) Quality of life assessment: International perspectives, Springer, Berlin (1994), pp. 41–57.