Research Issues when Evaluating the Quality of Health Care

5. Outcomes as Quality of Care Measures

Exercise 3

This exercise tests your knowledge of limitations of outcomes as quality of care measures.

Instructions:
Match each of the following examples with the corresponding limitation of outcomes as quality of care measures.

Examples:

  1. How long people survive after a heart attack depends on part on life style changes that they make.
  2. How well people function after hip replacement surgery depends in part on their fitness and mobility prior to their surgery and this is often not measured in a standardized way.
  3. Mortality after gall bladder surgery is very uncommon.
  4. The health status of patients in any given health insurance plan varies greatly.
  5. Patient care patterns are affected by their insurance, which varies greatly among patients.
  6. Stroke patients are typically only identified after they have already had a stroke.

Limitations of Outcomes as Quality of Care Measures:
Outcomes affected by social and clinical factors not related to treatment
Difficult to assess “pre-treatment” status
Outcome of interest too rate
Patient group not well-defined

Answers:

  1. How long people survive after a heart attack depends on part on life style changes that they make.
    [Outcomes affected by social and clinical factors not related to treatment]
  2. How well people function after hip replacement surgery depends in part on their fitness and mobility prior to their surgery and this is often not measured in a standardized way.
    [Difficult to assess “pre-treatment” status]
  3. Mortality after gall bladder surgery is very uncommon.
    [Outcome of interest too rate]
  4. The health status of patients in any given health insurance plan varies greatly.
    [Patient group not well-defined]
  5. Patient care patterns are affected by their insurance, which varies greatly among patients.
    [Outcomes affected by social and clinical factors not related to treatment]
  6. Stroke patients are typically only identified after they have already had a stroke.
    [Difficult to assess “pre-treatment” status]